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Knowledge at Work - UL Workplace Health & Safety

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Workplace Safety

Residential care and DART rates

July 16, 2012 - Posted by Dr. Scott Harris

In this installment of my series examining outreach letters that fed-OSHA recently sent to facilities with 2010 DART rates of 2.0 or higher, I’m looking at “Homes for the Elderly” (NAICS 623312), commonly referred to as residential / community care or assisted living facilities. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, “This U.S. industry comprises establishments primarily engaged in providing residential and personal care services (i.e., without on-site nursing care facilities) for (1) the elderly or other persons who are unable to fully care for themselves and/or (2) the elderly or other persons who do not desire to live independently. The care typically includes room, board, supervision, and assistance in daily living, such as housekeeping services.”

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Topics: compliance, workplace safety, OSHA, return to work

DART rates and nursing homes

May 17, 2012 - Posted by Dr. Scott Harris

In this installment of my series examining outreach letters that OSHA recently sent to facilities with two or more 2010 DART incidents, I’m looking at Nursing Care Facilities (NAICS 623110), commonly referred to as nursing homes. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, “These establishments have a permanent core staff of registered or licensed practical nurses who, along with other staff, provide nursing and continuous personal care services.”

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Topics: occupational health, workplace safety, OSHA, healthcare, return to work

Airline DART rates

May 10, 2012 - Posted by Dr. Scott Harris

A few weeks ago I wrote about the 15,000 outreach letters that OSHA recently sent to facilities with two or more 2010 DART incidents. What I’ll be doing next is going through that list and cross-referencing recipients with a DART rate database to see how individual sectors did. For no particular reason, let’s start with the airlines (NAICS 481111). To keep taunting, deflection and hate-mail to a minimum, I won’t mention any names.

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Topics: compliance, workplace safety, OSHA, return to work

When states require wrong answers

September 08, 2011 - Posted by Dr. Bill Newkirk

Colorado is the only state that still requires physicians to use the out-dated, third edition of the AMA’s Guides to the Evaluation of Permanent Impairment, published in 1990. The most recent, sixth edition of the Guides, was published in 2008. The Guides instruct physicians how to assign percentage ratings of impairment, which is defined as the loss, or loss of use of a body structure or function. The third edition of the Guides was important because it introduced a new way, called the “range of motion method”, to assign impairment to for the lower back. This method relied on the physician using two inclinometers (circular, plastic devices that register motion) simultaneously to record the amount an injured worker could move in flexion, extension, left lateral flexion and right lateral flexion. The method required numerous measures and a series of computations after the measures were recorded. Physicians frequently got it wrong.

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Topics: occupational health, workplace safety, healthcare, return to work